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A Bad Boy Can Be Good for a Girl

A Bad Boy Can Be Good for a Girl Tanya Lee Stone Wendy Lamb Books, 2006 Source: Library Audience: Older Teens
From Goodreads: Josie, Nicolette, and Aviva all get mixed up with a senior boy, a cool, slick, sexy boy who can talk them into doing almost anything he wants. In a blur of high school hormones and personal doubt, each girl struggles with how much to give up and what ultimately to keep for herself. How do girls handle themselves? How much can a boy get away with? And in the end, who comes out 
on top? A bad boy may always be a bad boy. But this bad boy is about to meet three girls who won't back down.

I chose to read A Bad Boy Can Be Good for a Girl because it was banned in Wyoming. I had never heard of this book before, but I had to read it to see what all the fuss was about. 
I understand that some parents would be uncomfortable with some of the passages in the book. However, all of the characters were in high school and all of the ladies made their own choices and explain…
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Andrew DeGraff, A.D. Jameson
Quirk Books, 2017
Source: Library
Audience: Adults, Older Teens

From Goodreads:
Acclaimed artist Andrew DeGraff has created beautiful hand-painted maps of all your favorite films, from King Kong and North by Northwest to The Princess BrideFargoPulp Fiction, even The Breakfast Club--with the routes of major characters charted in meticulous cartographic detail. Follow Marty McFly through the Hill Valley of 1985, 1955, and 1985 once again as he races Back to the Future. Trail Jack Torrance as he navigates the corridors of the Overlook Hotel in The Shining. And join Indiana Jones on a globe-spanning journey from Nepal to Cairo to London on his quest for the famed Lost Ark. Each map is presented in an 11-by-14-inch format, with key details enlarged for closer inspection, and is accompanied by illuminating essays by film critic A. D. Jameson, who speaks to the unique geographies of each film. This beautifully designed atlas is an essential reference…

Ink in Water

Ink in Water: An Illustrated Memoir (Or, How I Kicked Anorexia’s Ass and Embraced Body Positivity)
Lacy J. Davis
New Harbinger Publications, 2017
Source: Library
Audience: Adults, Older Teens

From Goodreads:
At once punk rock and poignant, Ink in Water is the visceral and groundbreaking graphic memoir of a young woman’s devastating struggle with negative body image and eating disorders, and how she rose above her own destructive behaviors and feelings of inadequacy to live a life of strength and empowerment.

As a young artist living in Portland, Lacy Davis’ eating disorder began with the germ of an idea: a seed of a thought that told her she just wasn’t good enough. And like ink in water, that idea spread until it reached every corner of her being. This is the true story of Lacy’s journey into the self-destructive world of multiple eating disorders. It starts with a young and positive Lacy, trying to grapple with our culture’s body-image obsession and stay true to her riot grrrl roots.…

Baby Monkey, Private Eye

Baby Monkey, Private Eye Brian Selznick, David Serlin Scholastic Press, 2018 Source: ARC Audience: Younger Children
From Goodreads: Who is Baby Monkey?

He is a baby.

He is a monkey.

He has a job.

He is Baby Monkey, Private Eye!

Lost jewels?

Missing pizza?

Stolen spaceship?

Baby Monkey can help...

if he can put on his pants!

Baby Monkey's adventures come to life in a blend of picture book, beginning reader, and graphic novel.

I enjoyed Baby Monkey, Private Eye so much. I think it’s technically a picture book, but it looks like a chapter book. It was delightfully cute and I always enjoy picture book mysteries. Kids will enjoy it!

Kimchi & Calamari

Kimchi & Calamari Rose Kent HarperCollins, 2007 Source: Library Audience: Children, Younger Teens
From Goodreads: Kimchi and calamari. It sounds like a quirky food fusion of Korean and Italian cuisine, and it's exactly how Joseph Calderaro feels about himself. Why wouldn't an adopted Korean drummer-comic book junkie feel like a combo platter given:
(1) his face in the mirror
(2) his proud Italian family. And now Joseph has to write an essay about his ancestors for social studies. All he knows is that his birth family shipped his diapered butt on a plane to the USA. End of story. But what he writes leads to a catastrophe messier than a table of shattered dishes—and self-discovery that Joseph never could have imagined.

Kimchi & Calamari reminded me of Far From the Tree, but for a younger audience. Joseph struggled with his Korean and Italian backgrounds and wanted to learn more about his birth family. He had a hard time talking to his parents about it, though. He was carin…

Her Right Foot

Her Right Foot
Dave Eggers
Chronicle Books, 2017
Source: My Own Bookshelf
Audience: Everyone

From Goodreads:
If you had to name a statue, any statue, odds are good you'd mention the Statue of Liberty. Have you seen her?

She's in New York. 
She's holding a torch. 
And she's in mid-stride, moving forward. 
But why?
In this fascinating, fun take on nonfiction, Dave Eggers and Shawn Harris investigate a seemingly small trait of America's most emblematic statue. What they find is about more than history, more than art. What they find in the Statue of Liberty's right foot is the powerful message of acceptance that is essential to an entire country's creation. 

This book was informational and inspirational. I absolutely loved it! I learned so much and the ending was PERFECT. I was lucky enough to meet Dave Eggers at ALA Midwinter and get this book signed. He was so kind and genuine. Also, he had the people waiting in line sign a copy with a message for a family of immi…

Long Way Down

Long Way Down
Jason Reynolds
Atheneum/Caitlyn Diouhy Books, 2017
Source: E-Galley, Library
Audience: Older Teens

From Goodreads:
A cannon. A strap.
A piece. A biscuit.
A burner. A heater.
A chopper. A gat.
A hammer
A tool
for RULE

Or, you can call it a gun. That’s what fifteen-year-old Will has shoved in the back waistband of his jeans. See, his brother Shawn was just murdered. And Will knows the rules. No crying. No snitching. Revenge. That’s where Will’s now heading, with that gun shoved in the back waistband of his jeans, the gun that was his brother’s gun. He gets on the elevator, seventh floor, stoked. He knows who he’s after. Or does he? 

As the elevator stops on the sixth floor, on comes Buck. Buck, Will finds out, is who gave Shawn the gun before Will took the gun. Buck tells Will to check that the gun is even loaded. And that’s when Will sees that one bullet is missing. And the only one who could have fired Shawn’s gun was Shawn. Huh. Will didn’t know that Shawn had ever actually use…