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Convenience Store Woman

Convenience Store Woman
Sayak Murata
Portobello Books, 2018
Source: E-Galley, Library
Audience: Adults, Older Teens

From Goodreads:
Keiko Furukura had always been considered a strange child, and her parents always worried how she would get on in the real world, so when she takes on a job in a convenience store while at university, they are delighted for her. For her part, in the convenience store she finds a predictable world mandated by the store manual, which dictates how the workers should act and what they should say, and she copies her coworkers' style of dress and speech patterns so she can play the part of a normal person. However, eighteen years later, at age 36, she is still in the same job, has never had a boyfriend, and has only few friends. She feels comfortable in her life but is aware that she is not living up to society's expectations and causing her family to worry about her. When a similarly alienated but cynical and bitter young man comes to work in the store,…
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Bingo Love

Bingo Love Tee Franklin Inclusive Press, 2017 Source: Library Audience: Adults, Older Teens
From Goodreads: Bingo Love is a story of a same-sex romance that spans over 60 years. A chance meeting at church bingo in 1963 brings Hazel Johnson and Mari McCray together. Through their formative years, these two women develop feelings for each other and finally profess their love for one another.

Forced apart by their families and society, Hazel and Mari both married young men and had families. Decades later, now in their mid 60’s, Hazel and Mari are reunited again at a bingo hall. Realizing their love for each other is still alive, what these grandmothers do next takes absolute strength and courage.

I loved the art style in Bingo Love. The romance was amazing, and I felt for all of the characters. There were a few cheesy parts, but what good romance doesn't have a few of those? There was only one part of the book that I really did not like: one character's story was not told in full.…

A Spark of Light

A Spark of Light
Jodi Picoult
Ballantine Books, 2018
Source: E-Galley
Audience: Adults, Older Teens

From Goodreads:
The warm fall day starts like any other at the Center—a women’s reproductive health services clinic—its staff offering care to anyone who passes through its doors. Then, in late morning, a desperate and distraught gunman bursts in and opens fire, taking all inside hostage.

After rushing to the scene, Hugh McElroy, a police hostage negotiator, sets up a perimeter and begins making a plan to communicate with the gunman. As his phone vibrates with incoming text messages he glances at it and, to his horror, finds out that his fifteen-year-old daughter, Wren, is inside the clinic.

But Wren is not alone. She will share the next and tensest few hours of her young life with a cast of unforgettable characters: A nurse who calms her own panic in order save the life of a wounded woman. A doctor who does his work not in spite of his faith but because of it, and who will find that fait…

They Lost Their Heads!

They Lost Their Heads! Carlyn Beccia Bloomsbury USA Childrens, 2018 Source: Library Audience: Children
From Goodreads: From the kidnapping of Einstein's brain to the horrifying end of Louis XIV's heart, the mysteries surrounding some of history's most famous body parts range from medical to macabre. Carlyn Beccia explores the misadventures of noteworthy body parts through history and springboards to exploring STEM topics such as forensics, DNA testing, brain science, organ donation, and cloning. The engaging tone, wonderfully creepy subject matter, and delightfully detailed art are sure to capture even the most reluctant readers.
How They Croaked was better. 
I enjoyed the book until I found a fact that said that Diego Rivera ate cadavers. After further investigation, my husband discovered that Rivera really exaggerated in his autobiography, and it probably wasn't true. Regardless of whether or not it was true, it should have been researched better by the author... I wo…

City of Ghosts

City of Ghosts
Victoria Schwab
Scholastic, 2018
Source: My Own Bookshelf
Audience: All Teens

From Goodreads:
Cassidy Blake's parents are The Inspectres, a (somewhat inept) ghost-hunting team. But Cass herself can REALLY see ghosts. In fact, her best friend, Jacob, just happens to be one.

When The Inspectres head to ultra-haunted Edinburgh, Scotland, for their new TV show, Cass—and Jacob—come along. In Scotland, Cass is surrounded by ghosts, not all of them friendly. Then she meets Lara, a girl who can also see the dead. But Lara tells Cassidy that as an In-betweener, their job is to send ghosts permanently beyond the Veil. Cass isn't sure about her new mission, but she does know the sinister Red Raven haunting the city doesn't belong in her world. Cassidy's powers will draw her into an epic fight that stretches through the worlds of the living and the dead, in order to save herself.


I enjoyed City of Ghosts. It reminded me of both The Mediator series by Meg Cabot and the…

Sheets

Sheets
Brenna Thummler
Lion Forge, 2018
Source: Library
Audience: Younger Teens

From Goodreads:
Marjorie Glatt feels like a ghost. A practical thirteen year old in charge of the family laundry business, her daily routine features unforgiving customers, unbearable P.E. classes, and the fastidious Mr. Saubertuck who is committed to destroying everything she’s worked for.

Wendell is a ghost. A boy who lost his life much too young, his daily routine features ineffective death therapy, a sheet-dependent identity, and a dangerous need to seek purpose in the forbidden human world.

When their worlds collide, Marjorie is confronted by unexplainable disasters as Wendell transforms Glatt’s Laundry into his midnight playground, appearing as a mere sheet during the day. While Wendell attempts to create a new afterlife for himself, he unknowingly sabotages the life that Marjorie is struggling to maintain.


Sheets was promoted like crazy. I saw ads for it everywhere, especially in my e-mails from publis…

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine Gail Honeyman Viking - Pamela Dorman Books, 2017 Source: E-Galley, My Own Bookshelf Audience: Adults, Older Teens
From Goodreads: No one’s ever told Eleanor that life should be better than fine. 

Meet Eleanor Oliphant: She struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she’s thinking. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding social interactions, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy. 

But everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond, the bumbling and deeply unhygienic IT guy from her office. When she and Raymond together save Sammy, an elderly gentleman who has fallen on the sidewalk, the three become the kinds of friends who rescue one another from the lives of isolation they have each been living. And it is Raymond’s big heart that will ultimately help Eleanor find the way to repair her own profoundly damaged one.

I enjoyed the book until the ending. It was co…