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Showing posts from July, 2018

Saving Red

Saving Red Sonia Sones HarperTeen, 2016 Source: Galley, E-Galley Audience: Older Teens
From Goodreads: My name is Molly. This book is about me.

I’m probably the guiltiest person who ever lived. But I’m not ready to talk about that yet. I may never be ready…

This book is about Pixel too, my almost human dog. And about Cristo, my possible future boyfriend.

Mostly, though, it’s about Red, the homeless girl I met in the part one night. She’s a few years older than me—reckless and wild and more fun than anyone.

But if Red’s survived on the streets these last few months, it’s only been ‘cause of dumb luck. And that luck might run out any second now.

That’s why I’ve made it my mission to get her back to her family. Though it’s hard to save someone when they don’t really want to be saved…

Well, “Red” is a horrible nickname for someone with red hair. Once I got over that, I enjoyed the book. The story slowly unraveled, which I liked, because I got to know more about Molly, Red, and their situations…

Among the Impostors

Among the Impostors
Margaret Peterson Haddix
Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2001
Source: Library
Audience: Children, Younger Teens

From Goodreads:
Luke Garner is terrified.  Out of hiding for the first time in his life, he knows that any minute one of his new classmates at Hendricks School for Boys could discover his secret: that he's a third child passing as the recently deceased Lee Grant. And in a society where it's illegal for families to have more than two children, being a third child means certain death at the hands of the dreaded Population Police.  His first experience outside the safety of his home is bewildering. There's not a single window anywhere in the school; Luke can't tell his classmates apart (even as they subject him to brutal hazing); and the teachers seem oblivious to it all.  Desperate to fit in, Luke endures the confusion and teasing until he discovers an unlocked door to the outside, and a chance to understand what is really going on.…

Among the Hidden

Among the Hidden
Margaret Peterson Haddix
Aladdin Paperbacks, 1998
Audience: Children, Younger Teens
Source: Library

From Goodreads:
SHADOW CHILDREN Luke has never been to school. He's never had a birthday party, or gone to a friend's house for an overnight. In fact, Luke has never had a friend.

Luke is one of the shadow children, a third child forbidden by the Population Police. He's lived his entire life in hiding, and now, with a new housing development replacing the woods next to his family's farm, he is no longer even allowed to go outside.

Then, one day Luke sees a girl's face in the window of a house where he knows two other children already live. Finally, he's met a shadow child like himself. Jen is willing to risk everything to come out of the shadows -- does Luke dare to become involved in her dangerous plan? Can he afford "not" to?


I remember enjoying Among the Hidden when it came out. As the series grew, I lost track of it and outgrew it. Ho…

Runaways: Find Your Way Home

Runaways: Find Your Way Home
Rainbow Rowell
Marvel, 2018
Source: My Own Bookshelf
Audience: All Teens

From Goodreads:
The "IT" book of the early 2000s with the original cast is back--Nico! Karolina! Molly! Chase! Old Lace! And, could it be...GERT?! 

The heart of the Runaways died years ago, but you won't believe how she returns! Superstar author Rainbow Rowell (Eleanor & Park, Carry On) makes her Marvel debut with fan-favorite artist Kris Anka (ALL-NEW X-MEN, CAPTAIN MARVEL) in the series that will shock you and break your heart! Did Chase and Gert's love survive their time apart? Have Karolina and Nico's feelings made their friendship impossible? What emotional landmines lie in wait to DESTROY the Runaways?!


Many years ago, I read the first book or two in the Runaways series. It was well-done and enjoyable, but I never finished the series. In spite of that, I still enjoyed Rowell’s installment. She did a good job of letting the reader know what occurred befor…

As the Crow Flies

As the Crow Flies
Melanie Gillman
Iron Circus Comics, 2017
Source: Library
Audience: All Teens

From Goodreads:
Melanie Gillman's webcomic about a queer, black teenager who finds herself stranded in a dangerous and unfamiliar place: an all-white Christian youth backpacking camp.

I didn’t realize that this was a webcomic until I looked at Goodreads to see when it was published. Perhaps that explains the cliffhanger ending?

I was frustrated with that cliffhanger ending because I WANTED TO KNOW WHAT HAPPENED. Perhaps Gillman is still working on it, and a sequel will come out? I’ll have to look up the webcomic and investigate further! I’m not a fan of camping myself, so I appreciated the main character’s frustration with that aspect and I learned a lot from her other experiences there. It was very well done. BUT WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THEY GET TO THEIR DESTINATION?!

All the Bright Places

All the Bright Places Jennifer Niven Knopf, 2015 Source: E-Galley, Library Audience: Older Teens
From Goodreads: Theodore Finch is fascinated by death, and he constantly thinks of ways he might kill himself. But each time, something good, no matter how small, stops him.

Violet Markey lives for the future, counting the days until graduation, when she can escape her Indiana town and her aching grief in the wake of her sister’s recent death.

When Finch and Violet meet on the ledge of the bell tower at school, it’s unclear who saves whom. And when they pair up on a project to discover the “natural wonders” of their state, both Finch and Violet make more important discoveries: It’s only with Violet that Finch can be himself—a weird, funny, live-out-loud guy who’s not such a freak after all. And it’s only with Finch that Violet can forget to count away the days and start living them. But as Violet’s world grows, Finch’s begins to shrink.

I enjoyed All the Bright Places in spite of the sadness…

Love & Gelato

Love & Gelato
Jenna Evans Welch
Simon Pulse, 2016
Source: E-Galley, My Own Bookshelf
Audience: All Teens

From Goodreads:
Lina is spending the summer in Tuscany, but she isn’t in the mood for Italy’s famous sunshine and fairy-tale landscape. She’s only there because it was her mother’s dying wish that she get to know her father. But what kind of father isn’t around for sixteen years? All Lina wants to do is get back home.

But then she is given a journal that her mom had kept when she lived in Italy. Suddenly Lina’s uncovering a magical world of secret romances, art, and hidden bakeries. A world that inspires Lina, along with the ever-so-charming Ren, to follow in her mother’s footsteps and unearth a secret that has been kept for far too long. It’s a secret that will change everything she knew about her mother, her father—and even herself.

People come to Italy for love and gelato, someone tells her, but sometimes they discover much more.


This is the perfect summer read. Love & Gela…

Sharp Objects

Sharp Objects
Gillian Flynn
2006, Broadway Paperbacks
Source: Library
Audience: Adults

From Goodreads:
Fresh from a brief stay at a psych hospital, reporter Camille Preaker faces a troubling assignment: she must return to her tiny hometown to cover the murders of two preteen girls. For years, Camille has hardly spoken to her neurotic, hypochondriac mother or to the half-sister she barely knows: a beautiful thirteen-year-old with an eerie grip on the town. Now, installed in her old bedroom in her family's Victorian mansion, Camille finds herself identifying with the young victims—a bit too strongly. Dogged by her own demons, she must unravel the psychological puzzle of her own past if she wants to get the story—and survive this homecoming.

Once I saw in the acknowledgements that this was Flynn’s first book, my reading experience made so much more sense!

The mystery was ok. There was a twist, like in Gone Girl, it just wasn’t a surprising one. I felt like the whole entire book set up…

Rebound

Rebound
Kwame Alexander
HMH Books for Young Readers, 2018
Source: Galley, Library
Audience: All Teens

From Goodreads:
Before Josh and Jordan Bell were streaking up and down the court, their father was learning his own moves. In this prequel to Newbery Medal winner The Crossover, Chuck Bell takes center stage, as readers get a glimpse of his childhood and how he became the jazz music worshipping, basketball star his sons look up to.   

This is the perfect book for reluctant readers - especially those that enjoy sports. It’s quick because it’s in verse, it has drama to hold interest, it has a love of basketball, and it includes graphic novel sections. I absolutely LOVED the graphic novel in verse pages. They were amazing! More writers should combine those two genres. It made for a true work of art. Even though I knew the story because I read The Crossover already, I enjoyed Rebound.